nSLAM / xjimmies v2.0
Reference Guide





Last update : February 2006
Previous update: January 2005
First version: March 2004

Table of contents
 
 
Credits
 
 
Introduction
 
 
How to install?


System Requirements


Xjimmies library reference guide

5gain2~
5pan2~
5pan3~
amp2db
apass3~
bal1~
click~
coef_bpass3~
coef_hlshelf2~
deg2rad
db1
db2amp
delay1~
envfol2~
fbdelay1~
flange1~
fshift1~
gain1~
gain2~
harmbank1~
harmv2~
helem1~
linedrivee~
loadbang1
loc-five.1~
loc-octo~
loc-quad~
loc-stereo~
locateN~
loop1~
meter1~
meter2~
meter4~
meter5~
meter8~
odrive1~
ogain2~
ogate2~
opan2~
opan3~
outchan-defs~
pan-five.1~
pan-octo~
pan-quad~
pan-stereo~
pan1~
panN~
pbank
pbankgui
peq1~
peq2~
peqbank1~
phaseshift1~
playsf~
probe1~
qbal1~
qgain2~
qgate2~
qpan2~
qpan3~
rad2deg
revdel1
rmod1~
sharedfloat
speedlim
split
stbal1~
stgain2~
stgate2~
stpan1~
stpan2~
stpan3~
sw1~
tone1~
trim1~
vu1~
vu2~
vu4~
vu5~
vu8~
zerocross~
zrev1~
zscale
 
 
Example applications

Proposed speaker setup

nSLAM for Linux installation guide


Thanks
 
 


Credits
 
 
nSLAM developped by the SAT Audio Group 2003 - 2006
 
xjimmies and nSLAM by Zack Settel 2003 - 2006

Reference guide and help files by Jean-Michel Dumas 2003 -2006 (for any issues with the doc: jm*sat.qc.ca)

xjimmies Max/MSP port by Jean-Michel Dumas 2005-2006
 
Packaging and online maintenance by Simon Piette 2004-2006

nSLAM for Linux installation guide by Sylvain Cormier 2005



The SAT Audio Group 2005 is :
 
Zack Settel
Jean-Michel Dumas
Simon Piette
 
The SAT audio Group is part of the Open Territories research team at the Societé des Arts Technologiques in Montreal. Visit www.tot.sat.qc.ca for more details and to contact us.

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Introduction
 
 
This reference guide contains information about the nSLAM audio suite, with detailed  informaion on the xjimmies DSP library that is bundled with nSLAM.
 
 
 
What is nSLAM?

Current version: 2.0

nSLAM is an open-source audio suite for multi-channel audio application development, developed by the SAT Audio Group. It is written for the PD (Pure Data, by M. Puckette) environment and includes a library of low-level DSP objects called “xjjimmies” (also running in Max/MSP), online help, and example applications for multi-channel audio streaming and immersive audio, among others. The nSLAM project draws on the xjimmies library, which is a continuation of “pdjimmies” and the original “jimmies” library, developed for the ISPW (Ircam Signal Processing Workstation) and then ported to MAX/MSP.

nSLAM includes several example applications, for both didactic and practical purposes; the applications can be easily modified by users wishing to develop their own custom applications. Applications for streaming, and multichannel sound processing are offered.


What are the xjimmies?

The “xjimmies” library included with nSLAM v. 2.0 offers new functionality not defined in the original “jimmies” running under Max/MSP. Specifically, a number of new objects have been added for working with multichannel sound, sound source simulation and immersive audio. The name of the library, formerly “pdjimmies”, was changed to “xjimmies”, since the “X”-platform library runs in both PD (Windows/OS-X/Linux) and in Max/MSP
(Windows/OS-X).
 

 
What is the structure of the nSLAM archive?
 
 
In the archive that you downloaded, you will find the following :
 

doc: documentation like this
 
examples : Example applications in pd
 
xjimmies : The library of pd/max externs, abstractions and help files, used by nSLAM
 
README : Technical information about the current release
 
resources : JROAR and ICECAST servers, and  source code for pd externs used by the example applications
 
src : Developer information and source code for the externs of the xjimmies library
 
 
note: On the nSLAM download page, an archive called "nSLAM-extra-n.n" is available; it contains two stand-alone applications (osx only) which  are "plug-n-play" stand-alone versions of the corresponding patches in the "examples" directory. A Jroar server (needed by the applications) is also provided.

note: As of version 2, you will also find nSlam_max.zip which is an archive of the xjimmies for use with max/MSP.


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How to install
 
 
INSTALLATION instructions for OS X and Linux


nSLAM-2.0 requires the Pure-Data (pd) environment to run in.  Thus, you must install pd first. Sources and/or binaries are available at:

http://www-crca.ucsd.edu/~msp/software.html

select /download and install a stable recent version of PD



OSX USERS:
You will also have to install the TLC/TK package at:

http://tcltkaqua.sourceforge.net/

select 8.4.1  for Mac OS 10.2 and later  (TclTkAqua-8.4.1-Jaguar.dmg) 

http://prdownloads.sourceforge.net/tcltkaqua/TclTkAqua-8.4.1-Jaguar.dmg?download

(you can always try a more recent version, up to 8.4.9, but  8.4.1 is known to work)



LINUX USERS:

see "linux how-to.pdf" (in /doc) for additional details




Once PD is installed and running, you can install nSLAM.


Expand the archive "nSLAMv2.zip"
Copy the directory "nSLAM" to some location on your hard disk. Copying to your home directory is fine. 


If you intend to compile the provided objects in nSLAM-2.0/src or nSLAM-2.0/resources, then you should copy the nSLAM-2.0 directory to the same directory that your pd release is in.  e.g.:
myDevDir/pd-0.37-4
myDevDir/nSLAM-1.0

This will insure that the needed pd ".h" files are found automatically




All packages, tarballs and installers are available through TOT's project web site: http:http://tot.sat.qc.ca/


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System Requirements
 
 
 
The "xjimmies" library at the heart of nSLAM  contains objects that make modest demands on the CPU.   However, some of the example applications do perform multi-channel processing and/or audio encoding and are thus quite processor intensive.  To run these encoding applications, we recommend using a machine with CPU power at least equivalent to a dual 1.25ghz G4 Apple, or 1.6ghz Dell computer.
 
 
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Xjimmies 0.1  library reference guide
 
note : In this guide, inlets and outlets for the xjimmies will be given numbers from left to right.


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5gain2~
5 channels gain control

 
See also gain2~, stgain2~, qgain2~ and ogain2~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Channel 1 audio signal
Inlet_2 : Channel 2 audio signal
Inlet_3 : Channel 3 audio signal
Inlet_4 : Channel 4 audio signal
Inlet_5 : Channel 5 audio signal
Inlet_6 : Attenuation level in decibels (default is 0db)
Inlet_7 : Fadetime in milliseconds
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Attenuated channel 1 audio signal
Outlet_2 : Attenuated channel 2 audio signal
Outlet_3 : Attenuated channel 3 audio signal
Outlet_4 : Attenuated channel 4 audio signal
Outlet_5 : Attenuated channel 5 audio signal
 
Example :
 



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5pan2~
pans 1 input to 5 outputs

 
See also stpan2~, qpan2~ and opan2~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Azimuth value in degrees
Inlet_3 : Separation factor
Inlet_4 : Fadetime in milliseconds
Inlet_5 : Ch2 separation factor (linked to inlet_3 value)

Output
 
Outlet_1 : Panned channel 1
Outlet_2 : Panned channel 2
Outlet_3 : Panned channel 3
Outlet_4 : Panned channel 4
Outlet_5 : Panned channel 5
 
Example :
 



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5pan3~
pans 1 input to 5 outputs

 
See also stpan3~, qpan3~ and opan3~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Azimuth value in degrees
Inlet_3 : Elevation factor
Inlet_4 : Spread factor
Inlet_5 : Fadetime in milliseconds
Inlet_6 : Loudspeakers definition

Output
 
Outlet_1 : Panned channel 1
Outlet_2 : Panned channel 2
Outlet_3 : Panned channel 3
Outlet_4 : Panned channel 4
Outlet_5 : Panned channel 5
 
Example :
 



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amp2db
converts amplitude to dBs

 
See also db2amp.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Amplitude value


Output
 
Outlet_1 : dB value

 
Example :
 



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apass3~
second order all-pass filter

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Transition frequency in hertz
Inlet_3 : Transition width in hertz

Output
 
Outlet_1 : Filtered audio signal
 
Example :
 



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bal1~
makes a balanced mix of inputs A and B

 
See also stbal1~ and qbal1~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Input A (audio signal)
Inlet_2 : Input B (audio signal)
Inlet_3 : Balance value (between –1 and 1)

Output
 
Outlet_1 : Balanced mix of inputs A and B
 
Example :
 
 


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click~
generates a click

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Bang to click
Inlet_2 : Takes a list to generate a table (by default a click enveloppe)

Output
 
Outlet_1 : Audio output
 
Example :
 


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coef_bpass3~
coefficient calculator for use with biquad~

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Boost/cut value in db
Inlet_2 : Center frequency in hertz
Inlet_3 : Bandwidth value in octaves

Output
 
Outlet_1 : Value string to use with biquad~

Arguments

Arg_1 : Boost/cut value at 0hz in db (default is 0db)
Arg_2 : Center frequency in hz (default is 500hz)
Arg_3 : Bandwidth in octaves (default is 0.5 octaves)
 
Example :
 


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coef_hlshelf2~
coefficient calculator for use with biquad~

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Boost/cut value in db
Inlet_2 : Middle boost/cut value in db
Inlet_3 : Boost/cut value at SR/2 hz in db (SR=sample rate)
Inlet_4 : Low transition frequency in hz
Inlet_5 : High transition frequency in hz

Output
 
Outlet_1 : Value string to use with biquad~

Arguments

Arg_1 : Boost/cut value at 0hz in db (default is 0db)
Arg_2 : Middle boost/cut value in db (default is 0db)
Arg_3 : Boost/cut value at SR/2 hz in db (default is 0db)
Arg_4 : Low transition frequency in hz (default is 150hz)
Arg_5 : High transition frequency in hz (default is 5000hz)
 
Example :
 


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db1
converts ticks into dbs

 
This object is used with the gain1~ object, converting gain1~'s control signal to the DB scale.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Numeric value
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Numeric value converted to db scale
 
Example :
 



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db2amp
pans 1 input to 5 outputs

 
See also amp2db.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 :  dB value


Output
 
Outlet_1 : amplitude value

 
Example :
 



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deg2rad
degree to radiant conversion

See also rad2deg

Input
 
Inlet_1 : degree value to be converted
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : radiant value
 
Example :


 



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delay1~
a simple delay element

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal to be delayed
Inlet_2 : Delay time in milliseconds
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Delayed audio signal
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Delay time in milliseconds
 
Example :
 



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envfol2~
envelope follower

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Responsiveness in hertz (default is 50hz)
Inlet_3 : Off/On (0/1, default is 1)
Inlet_4 : Update rate in milliseconds (default is 10ms)
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Envelope control rate
Outlet_2 : Envelope audio rate
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Optional time resolution in milliseconds (default is 10ms)
Arg_2 : Optional low-pass filter cut-off frequency in hertz (default is 50hz)

Example :
 



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fbdelay1~
simple delay element with feedback level

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal to be delayed
Inlet_2 : Delay time in milliseconds
Inlet_3 : Feedback level in percentage
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Delayed audio signal
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Delay time in milliseconds
 
Example :




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flange1~
basic flanger effect

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal to be flanged
Inlet_2 : Resonant frequency in hertz (default is 200hz)
Inlet_3 : Portamento rate in milliseconds
Inlet_4 : Feedback intensity (default is 0.94)
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Flanged audio signal
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Delay time in milliseconds
Arg_2 : Optional frequency in hertz
 
Example :



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fshift1~
frequency shifter

 
This object is based on M. Puckette's version.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal to be shifted
Inlet_2 : Reference frequency in hertz (default is 200hz)
Inlet_3 : Portamento rate in milliseconds (default is 6ms)
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Positive sidebands (audio)
Outlet_2 : Negative sidebands (audio)
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Optional frequency shift in hertz (default is 200hz)
 
Example :



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gain1~
attenuator

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Attenuation value
Inlet_3 : Ramp time in milliseconds (default is 30ms)
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Attenuated audio signal
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Optional ramp time in milliseconds
 
Example :
 



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gain2~
mono gain control

 
See also stgain2~, qgain2~, 5gain2~ and ogain2~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Numeric gain value
Inlet_3 : Fade time in milliseconds (default is 30)
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Controlled audio signal
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Range in decibels (default is –127 : +18db)
Arg_2 : Optional fade time in milliseconds (default is 30ms)
 
Example :
 



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harmbank1~
bank of harmonizers

 
See also the pbank and the pbankgui objects.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal to be harmonized
Inlet_2 : Pbank messages (read, write, recall, store)
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Left channel audio signal
Outlet_2 : Right channel audio signal
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Bank/memory name
 
Example :
 

Parameter definition for one preset
 
0 : transposition (-24000 : 24000 cents)
1 : window size (1 : 1000 ms)
2 : delay (2 : 6000 ms)
3 : panning (-1 : 1)
4 : gain (-127 : +18db where 0 is unity)
 
Example :



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harmv2~
simple harmonizer voice element

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Transposition value in cents
Inlet_2 : Window size in milliseconds
Inlet_3 : Delay time in milliseconds
Inlet_4 : Pan value
Inlet_5 : Gain value in decibels
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Left channel audio signal
Outlet_2 : Right channel audio signal
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Delay name
 
Example :
 



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helem1~
harmonizer voice element


Input
 
Inlet_1 : Transposition value in cents
Inlet_2 : Window size in milliseconds
Inlet_3 : Delay value in milliseconds
Inlet_4 : Pan value (-1 : 1)
Inlet_5 : Gain value in decibels
Inlet_6 : Used to receive messages specific to helem1~Õs argument
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Audio signal
Outlet_2 : Audio signal
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Delay memory name
Arg_2 : Voice name
 
Example :
 



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linedrivee
linear to non-linear conversion

 
Based on the original linedrive object by Miller Puckette for the ISPW system. Below is some documentation for the same object in MAX/MSP.  The extra "e" in the name is because this version of linedrive is female.
 
 



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loadbang1
loadbang anything at startup


Input

Inlet_1 : Bang to output

Arg_1 : Item to be output at startup

Output : Specified item in Arg_1




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loc-five.1~
locator tool for 5.1 signals

 
See also loc-stereo~, loc-quad~ and loc-octo~.
 
Input
 
Arg_1 : Input name
Arg_2 : Output name
 
The input is received using a send. The correct syntax is : <send~ input_name~>.
 
The azimuth, spread, elevation and fadetime values are received using sends. The correct syntaxes are :
<send input_name-azimuth>
<send input_name-spread>
<send input_name-elevation>
<send input_name-fadetime>

Output
 
The object sends the audio signal to the corresponding bus receive~ object. Busses are labeled in order starting with bus1. The correct syntax is : <receive~ output_name-busN>.
 
Example :




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loc-octo~
locator tool for octophonic signals

 
See also loc-stereo~, loc-quad~ and loc-five.1~.
 
Input
 
Arg_1 : Input name
Arg_2 : Output name
 
The input is received using a send. The correct syntax is : <send~ input_name~>.
 
The azimuth, spread, elevation and fadetime values are received using sends. The correct syntaxes are :
<send input_name-azimuth>
<send input_name-spread>
<send input_name-elevation>
<send input_name-fadetime>
 
 
Output
 
The object sends the audio signal to the corresponding bus receive~ object. Busses are labeled in order starting with bus1. The correct syntax is : <receive~ output_name-busN>.
 
 
Example :
 
 



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loc-quad~
locator tool for quadraphonic signals

 
See also loc-stereo~, loc-five.1~ and loc-octo~.
 
Input
 
Arg_1 : Input name
Arg_2 : Output name
 
The audio input is received using a send. The correct syntax is : <send~ input_name~>.
 
The azimuth, spread, elevation and fadetime values are received using sends. The correct syntaxes are :
<send input_name-azimuth>
<send input_name-spread>
<send input_name-elevation>
<send input_name-fadetime>

Output
 
The object sends the audio signal to the corresponding bus receive~ object. Busses are labeled in order starting with bus1. The correct syntax is : <receive~ output_name-busN>.
 
Example :




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loc-stereo~
locator tool for stereo signals

 
See also loc-quad~, loc-five.1~ and loc-octo~.
 
Input
 
Arg_1 : Input name
Arg_2 : Output name
 
The audio input is received using a send. The correct syntax is : <send~ input_name~>.
 
The azimuth, spread, elevation and fadetime values are received using sends. The correct syntaxes are :
<send input_name-azimuth>
<send input_name-spread>
<send input_name-elevation>
<send input_name-fadetime>
 
Output
 
The object sends the audio signal to the corresponding bus receive~ object. Busses are labeled in order starting with bus1. The correct syntax is : <receive~ output_name-busN>.
 
Example :
 



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locateN~
distributes 1 input to 8 outputs using geometric models

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Azimuth value
Inlet_3 : Elevation value
Inlet_4 : Spread value
Inlet_5 : Fadetime value
Inlet_6 : Loudspeakers setup
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Distributed channel 1
Outlet_2 : Distributed channel 2
Outlet_3 : Distributed channel 3
Outlet_4 : Distributed channel 4
Outlet_5 : Distributed channel 5
Outlet_6 : Distributed channel 6
Outlet_7 : Distributed channel 7
Outlet_8 : Distributed channel 8
Outlet_9 : Bangs when loudspeaker setup is changed
 
Example :



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loop1~
audio file looper with phase input

Input
 
Inlet_1 : Bang chooses an audio file from the dialog window
Inlet_1 : "phase $1" retriggers the loop with new read head position
Inlet_2 : File name to be opened (a path can also be specified)
 
Ouptut
 
Outlet_1 : Looped audio signal
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : File name to be read (default is stevie.aif)

no file name opens a dialog box

 
Example :
 



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meter1~
monophonic signal visual display

 
Also see meter2~, meter4~, meter5~ and meter8~. The meterN~ objects take an audio signal input and display a range of –90 to +18db.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Receives a bang to reset the peak meter
 
Example :
 



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meter2~
stereophonic signal visual display

 
Also see meter1~, meter4~, meter5~ and meter8~. The meterN~ objects take an audio signal input and display a range of –90 to +18db.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Left channel audio signal
Inlet_2 : Right channel audio signal
Inlet_3 : Receives a bang to reset the peak meter
 
Example :
 



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meter4~
quadraphonic signal visual display

 
Also see meter1~, meter2~, meter5~ and meter8~. The meterN~ objects take an audio signal input and display a range of –90 to +18db.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Channel 1 audio signal
Inlet_2 : Channel 2 audio signal
Inlet_3 : Channel 3 audio signal
Inlet_4 : Channel 4 audio signal
Inlet_5 : Receives a bang to reset the peak meter
 
Example :
 



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meter5~
five channel signal visual display

 
Also see meter1~, meter2~ meter4~ and meter8~. The meterN~ objects take an audio signal input and display a range of –90 to +18db.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Channel 1 audio signal
Inlet_2 : Channel 2 audio signal
Inlet_3 : Channel 3 audio signal
Inlet_4 : Channel 4 audio signal
Inlet_5 : Channel 4 audio signal
Inlet_6 : Receives a bang to reset the peak meter
Inlet_7 : Receives values for appearance
 
Example :
 



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meter8~
octophonic signal visual display

 
Also see meter1~, meter2~, meter4~ and meter5~. The meterN~ objects take an audio signal input and display a range of –90 to +18db.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Channel 1 audio signal
Inlet_2 : Channel 2 audio signal
Inlet_3 : Channel 3 audio signal
Inlet_4 : Channel 4 audio signal
Inlet_5 : Channel 5 audio signal
Inlet_6 : Channel 6 audio signal
Inlet_7 : Channel 7 audio signal
Inlet_8 : Channel 8 audio signal
Inlet_9 : Receives a bang to reset the peak meter
 
Example :
 



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odrive1~
overdrive element

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Clipping value (clipped as -$f1 : $f1)
Inlet_3 : Boost value
Inlet_4 : On/Off switch for waveform display in table


Output
 
Outlet_1 : overdriven signal

 
Example :
 



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ogain2~
octophonic gain control

 
See also gain2~, stgain2~, qgain2~ and 5gain2~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Channel 1 audio signal
Inlet_2 : Channel 2 audio signal
Inlet_3 : Channel 3 audio signal
Inlet_4 : Channel 4 audio signal
Inlet_5 : Channel 5 audio signal
Inlet_6 : Channel 6 audio signal
Inlet_7 : Channel 7 audio signal
Inlet_8 : Channel 8 audio signal
Inlet_9 : Attenuation level in decibels (default is 0db)
Inlet_10 : Fade time in milliseconds (default is 30ms)
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Attenuated channel 1 audio signal
Outlet_2 : Attenuated channel 2 audio signal
Outlet_3 : Attenuated channel 3 audio signal
Outlet_4 : Attenuated channel 4 audio signal
Outlet_5 : Attenuated channel 5 audio signal
Outlet_6 : Attenuated channel 6 audio signal
Outlet_7 : Attenuated channel 7 audio signal
Outlet_8 : Attenuated channel 8 audio signal
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Attenuation range in decibels (-127 : +18db)
Arg_2 : Optional fade time in milliseconds (default is 30ms)


Example :
 



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ogate2~
continuous audio gate (8 channels)

 
See also stgate2~ and qgate2~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal 1
Inlet_2 : Audio signal 2
Inlet_3 : Audio signal 3
Inlet_4 : Audio signal 4
Inlet_5 : Audio signal 5
Inlet_6 : Audio signal 6
Inlet_7 : Audio signal 7
Inlet_8 : Audio signal 8
Inlet_9 : Selection value in degrees
Inlet_10 : Separation value
Inlet_11 : Fadetime value in milliseconds
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Gated signal
 
Example :
 



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opan2~
pans 1 input to 8 outputs

 
See also stpan2~, qpan2~ and 5pan2~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Azimuth value in degrees
Inlet_3 : Separation factor
Inlet_4 : Fadetime in milliseconds
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Panned channel 1
Outlet_2 : Panned channel 2
Outlet_3 : Panned channel 3
Outlet_4 : Panned channel 4
Outlet_5 : Panned channel 5
Outlet_6 : Panned channel 6
Outlet_7 : Panned channel 7
Outlet_8 : Panned channel 8
 
Example :
 
 



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opan3~
pans 1 input to 8 outputs

 
See also stpan3~, qpan3~ and 5pan3~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Azimuth value in degrees
Inlet_3 : Elevation factor
Inlet_4 : Spread factor
Inlet_4 : Fadetime in milliseconds
Inlet_5 : Loudspeakers definition
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Panned channel 1
Outlet_2 : Panned channel 2
Outlet_3 : Panned channel 3
Outlet_4 : Panned channel 4
Outlet_5 : Panned channel 5
Outlet_6 : Panned channel 6
Outlet_7 : Panned channel 7
Outlet_8 : Panned channel 8
 
Example :
 
 



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outchan-defs~
speakers placement tool

 
Based on Ville Pulki's code.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Accepts the following symbols : stereo, quad, five.1 and octo
Inlet_2 : Integers transformed to symbols : 0=stereo, 1=quad, 2=five.1, 3=octo
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Speakers location expressed as angles on the plane (listener in the middle)
Outlet_2 : Speakers location <speaker1 azimuth> <speakerN azimuth>
Outlet_3 : Outputs current configuration as a symbol
 
Example :
 
 



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pan-five.1~
pans between 5 channels

 
See also pan-stereo~, pan-quad~ and pan-octo~.
 
Input
 
Arg_1 : Input name
Arg_2 : Output name
 
The input is received using a send. The correct syntax is : <send~ input_name~>.
 
The azimuth, spread and fadetime values are received using sends. The correct syntaxes are :
<send input_name-azimuth>
<send input_name-spread>
<send input_name-fadetime>
 
Output
 
The object sends the audio signal to the corresponding bus receive~ object. Busses are labeled in order starting with bus1. The correct syntax is : <receive~ output_name-busN>.
 
Example :




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pan-octo~
pans between 8 channels

 
See also pan-stereo~, pan-quad~ and pan-five.1~.
 
Input
 
Arg_1 : Input name
Arg_2 : Output name
 
The input is received using a send. The correct syntax is : <send~ input_name~>.
 
The azimuth, spread and fadetime values are received using sends. The correct syntaxes are :
<send input_name-azimuth>
<send input_name-spread>
<send input_name-fadetime>
 
Output
 
The object sends the audio signal to the corresponding bus receive~ object. Busses are labeled in order starting with bus1. The correct syntax is : <receive~ output_name-busN>.
 
Example :
 
 



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pan-quad~
pans between 4 channels

 
See also pan-stereo~, pan-five.1~ and pan-octo~.
 
Input
 
Arg_1 : Input name
Arg_2 : Output name
 
The input is received using a send. The correct syntax is : <send~ input_name~>.
 
The azimuth, spread and fadetime values are received using sends. The correct syntaxes are :
<send input_name-azimuth>
<send input_name-spread>
<send input_name-fadetime>
 
Output
 
The object sends the audio signal to the corresponding bus receive~ object. Busses are labeled in order starting with bus1. The correct syntax is : <receive~ output_name-busN>.
 
Example :
 
 



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pan-stereo~
pans between 2 channels

 
See also pan-quad~, pan-five.1~ and pan-octo~.
 
Input
 
Arg_1 : Input name
Arg_2 : Output name
 
The input is received using a send. The correct syntax is : <send~ input_name~>.
 
The azimuth, spread and fadetime values are received using sends. The correct syntaxes are :
<send input_name-azimuth>
<send input_name-spread>
<send input_name-fadetime>
 
Output
 
The object sends the audio signal to the corresponding bus receive~ object. Busses are labeled in order starting with bus1. The correct syntax is : <receive~ output_name-busN>.
 
Example :
 
 



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pan1~
monophonic paning unit

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal to be paned
Inlet_2 : Paning value (L=-1 C=0 R=1)
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Left channel audio signal
Outlet_2 : Right channel audio signal
 
Example :
 



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panN~
distributes 1 input to 8 ouputs

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Azimuth value
Inlet_3 : Elevation value
Inlet_4 : Spread value
Inlet_5 : Fadetime value
Inlet_6 : Loudspeakers setup
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Panned channel 1
Outlet_2 : Panned channel 2
Outlet_3 : Panned channel 3
Outlet_4 : Panned channel 4
Outlet_5 : Panned channel 5
Outlet_6 : Panned channel 6
Outlet_7 : Panned channel 7
Outlet_8 : Panned channel 8
Outlet_9 : Bangs when loudspeaker setup is changed
 
Example :
 
 



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pbank
parameter bank

 
See also the pbankgui object.
 
Note : The structure of pbank includes an additional row that serves as an edit buffer (see messages).
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Receives the following list of messages
 
SET :

-set list of elements starting at column_n in row_n
 
NUMBERS :

-write n_value to column_n of row_n
-read n_value at column_n of row_n
 
SYMBOLS :

-write symbol_n to column_n at row_n
 
PUT :

-put list of elements starting at column_n in edit buffer
 
RECALL :

-recalls row_n and copies it into edit buffer
 
STORE :

-copy edit buffer to row_n
 
READ :

-load a .pbank file
 
WRITE :

-save a .pbank file
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Outputs lists in the form of <column_n item_n>
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Number of columns (X axis)
Arg_2 : Number of rows (Y axis)
Arg_3 : Name of the pbank
Arg_4 : Optional symbol for output (default is through the outlet)
 
Example :
 


NOTE: interp s1 s2 s3 ....  s<max-rows> ....  interpolation between pbank rows : new output row = s1 * row1 + s2 * row2 + s3 * row3 + s<max-rows> * max-rows;  where, s1 + s2 + s3 ..... s<max-rows>  = 1 (unity).  Each value in the generated row is a wighted sum of the corresponding (column) value in all the rows of the pbank. (method provided by Cyril Henry)


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pbankgui1
parameter bank with a gui

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Numeric value to be written at position 0 of the buffer
 
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Data on the preset recalled
 
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Columns (n≤1)
Arg_2 : Columns (n ≥1)
Arg_3 : Optional send name for wireless receiving
 
 
Example :
 



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peq1~
parametric eq

See also peq2~, peqbank1~ and tone1~

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal to be filtered
Inlet_2 : Low shelf boost/cut value in db
Inlet_3 : Low shelf cutoff frequency in hz
Inlet_4 : High shelf boost/cut value in db
Inlet_5 : High shelf cutoff frequency in hz
 
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Filtered audio signal
 
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Center frequency in hz
Arg_2 : Bandwidth in octaves
 

Example :
 



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peq2~
parametric eq

See also peq1~, peqbank1~ and tone1~

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal to be filtered
Inlet_2 : Boost/cut value in db
Inlet_3 : Center frequency value in hz
Inlet_4 : Bandwidth value in octaves
 

Output
 
Outlet_1 : Filtered audio signal
 
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Center frequency in hz
Arg_2 : Bandwidth in octaves
 

Example :
 



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peqbank1~
parametric eq filterbank

See also peq1~, peq2~ and tone1~

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal to be filtered
Inlet_2 : Low shelf boost/cut value in db
Inlet_3 : Low shelf cutoff frequency in hz
Inlet_4 : Bandpass A boost/cut value in db
Inlet_5 : Bandpass A center frequency value in hz
Inlet_6 : Bandpass A bandwidth value in octaves
Inlet_7 : Bandpass B boost/cut value in db
Inlet_8 : Bandpass B center frequency value in hz
Inlet_9 : Bandpass B bandwidth value in octaves
Inlet_10 : High shelf boost/cut value in db
Inlet_11 : High shelf cutoff frequency in hz

 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Filtered audio signal
Outlet_2 : Constrained low shelf cutoff frequency
Outlet_3 : Constrained high shelf cutoff frequency
 


Example :
 



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phaseshift1~
phase shifter

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Notch/peak depth in hertz
Inlet_3 : Notch/peak width in hertz
Inlet_4 : Offset in hertz
Inlet_5 : LFO frequency in hertz
Inlet_6 : LFO phase in %
Inlet_7 : Ouput mix (peak vs. notch)

Output
 
Outlet_1 : Phased audio signal
 
Example :
 



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playsf~
soundfile player

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Name of the soundfile to be read (default is stevie.aif)
Inlet_2 : On/off switch (0/1 toggle)
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Audio signal
 
Buttons
 
Play : Start/stop playing file
Read : Choose file to be played through dialog window
 
 
Example :
 



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probe1~
numeric display of an audio signal

 
The probe1~ object takes a snapshot of the audio every 100 milliseconds by default. It is only a metering tool so there is no output currently built-in.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
 
Example :
 



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qbal1~
makes a balanced mix of quadraphonic inputs A and B

 
See also bal1~ and stbal1~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Channel 1 of audio signal A
Inlet_2 : Channel 2 of audio signal A
Inlet_3 : Channel 3 of audio signal A
Inlet_4 : Channel 4 of audio signal A
Inlet_5 : Channel 1 of audio signal B
Inlet_6 : Channel 2 of audio signal B
Inlet_7 : Channel 3 of audio signal B
Inlet_8 : Channel 4 of audio signal B
Inlet_9 : Balance value (between –1 and 1)
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Channel 1 of the balanced mix of inputs A and B
Outlet_2 : Channel 2 of the balanced mix of inputs A and B
Outlet_3 : Channel 3 of the balanced mix of inputs A and B
Outlet_4 : Channel 4 of the balanced mix of inputs A and B
 
 
Example :
 



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qgain2~
quadraphonic gain control

 
See also gain2~, stgain2~, 5gain2~ and ogain2~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Channel 1 audio signal
Inlet_2 : Channel 2 audio signal
Inlet_3 : Channel 3 audio signal
Inlet_4 : Channel 4 audio signal
Inlet_5 : Attenuation level in decibels (default is 0db)
Inlet_6 : Fade time in milliseconds (default is 30ms)

Output
 
Outlet_1 : Attenuated channel 1 audio signal
Outlet_2 : Attenuated channel 2 audio signal
Outlet_3 : Attenuated channel 3 audio signal
Outlet_4 : Attenuated channel 4 audio signal
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Attenuation range in decibels (-127 : +18db)
Arg_2 : Optional fade time in milliseconds (default is 30ms)
 
Example :
 



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qgate2~
continuous audio gate (4 channels)

 
See also stgate2~ and ogate2~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal 1
Inlet_2 : Audio signal 2
Inlet_3 : Audio signal 3
Inlet_4 : Audio signal 4
Inlet_5 : Selection value in degrees
Inlet_6 : Separation value
Inlet_7 : Fadetime value in milliseconds
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Gated signal
 
Example :
 
 



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qpan2~
pans 1 input to 4 outputs

 
See also stpan2~, 5pan2~ and opan2~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Azimuth value in degrees
Inlet_3 : Separation factor
Inlet_4 : Fadetime in milliseconds
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Panned channel 1
Outlet_2 : Panned channel 2
Outlet_3 : Panned channel 3
Outlet_4 : Panned channel 4
 
Example :
 
 



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qpan3~
pans 1 input to 4 outputs

 
See also stpan3~, 5pan3~ and opan3~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Azimuth value in degrees
Inlet_3 : Elevation factor
Inlet_4 : Spread factor
Inlet_4 : Fadetime in milliseconds
Inlet_5 : Loudspeakers definition
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Panned channel 1
Outlet_2 : Panned channel 2
Outlet_3 : Panned channel 3
Outlet_4 : Panned channel 4
 
Example :
 
 



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rad2deg
radiant to radegree conversion

see also deg2rad

Input
 
Inlet_1 : radiant value to be converted
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : degree value
 
Example :






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revdel1~
simple delay element

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Audio signal
Inlet_3 : Delay scaler value
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Delayed audio signal
Outlet_2 : Delayed audio signal
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Delay time in milliseconds
 
 
Example :
 



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rmod1~
ring modulator

 
Note : If the input signal has a strong DC component, the reference tone will be heard all by itself. To fix this, try high-passing the input.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal to be modulated
Inlet_2 : Reference frequency in hertz
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Ring-modulated audio signal
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Optional modulator frequency in hertz (default is 200hz)
 
 
Example :
 



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sharedfloat
GOP helper object to share the same float

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Float number to be shared

Arg_1 : send name

Output
 
Outlet_1 : Unchanged float number
 
Example :





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speedlim
limit the speed of floats going through

Based on the max/MSP object of the same name

Input
 
Inlet_1 : Floats to be limited

Inlet_2 : Variable speed limiting time in ms

Arg_1 : Speed limiting time in ms

Output
 
Outlet_1 : Limited floats
 
Example :






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split
looks for a range of numbers

 
Based on the split object from Max/MSP.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Number to be analyzed
Inlet_2 : Lower range value
Inlet_3 : Higher range value
 
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Outputs value if within limits
Outlet_2 : Outputs value if outside limits
 
Example :
 
 



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stbal1~
makes a balanced mix of stereophonic inputs A and B

 
See also bal1~ and qbal1~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Left channel of audio signal A
Inlet_2 : Right channel of audio signal A
Inlet_3 : Left channel of audio signal B
Inlet_4 : Right channel audio signal B
Inlet_5 : Balance value (between –1 and 1)
 
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Left channel of the balanced mix of inputs A and B
Outlet_2 : Right channel of the balanced mix of inputs A and B
 
 
Example :
 



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stgain2~
stereophonic gain control

 
See also gain2~, qgain2~, 5gain2~ and ogain2~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Left channel of audio signal
Inlet_2 : Right channel of audio signal
Inlet_5 : Attenuation level in decibels (default is 0db)
Inlet_6 : Fade time in milliseconds (default is 30ms)
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Attenuated left channel of audio signal
Outlet_2 : Attenuated right channel of audio signal
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Attenuation range in decibels (-127 : +18db)
Arg_2 : Optional fade time in milliseconds (default is 30ms)
 
 
Example :



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stgate2~
continuous audio gate (2 channels)

 
See also qgate2~ and ogate2~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal 1
Inlet_2 : Audio signal 2
Inlet_3 : Selection value in degrees
Inlet_4 : Separation value
Inlet_5 : Fadetime value in milliseconds
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Gated signal
 
Example :
 
 



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stpan1~
stereophonic paning unit

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Left channel of audio signal to be paned
Inlet_2 : Right channel of audio signal to be paned
Inlet_3 : Paning value (-1 = L1-R1 : +1 = L2-R2)
 
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Left channel of audio signal A
Outlet_2 : Left channel of audio signal B
Outlet_3 : Right channel of audio signal A
Outlet_4 : Right channel of audio signal B
 
Example (when using two mono files) :
 



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stpan2~
pans 1 input to 2 outputs

 
See also qpan2~, 5pan2~ and opan2~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Azimuth value in degrees
Inlet_3 : Separation factor
Inlet_4 : Fadetime in milliseconds
 
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Panned channel 1
Outlet_2 : Panned channel 2
 
 
Example :
 
 



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stpan3~
pans 1 input to 2 outputs

 
See also qpan3~, 5pan3~ and opan3~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Azimuth value in degrees
Inlet_3 : Elevation factor
Inlet_4 : Spread factor
Inlet_4 : Fadetime in milliseconds
Inlet_5 : Loudspeakers definition
 
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Panned channel 1
Outlet_2 : Panned channel 2
 
 
Example :
 
 



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sw1~
audio switch

 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : On/off (1 : 0)
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Audio signal
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Optional receive name for switch control
 
Example :
 



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tone1~
tone control element

See also peq1~, peq2~ and peqbank1~


Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Bass gain value in db
Inlet_3 : Mid gain value in db
Inlet_4 : Treble gain value in db 
 

Output
 
Outlet_1 : Audio signal
 

Example :
 



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trim1~
attenuator stages

 
Note : There is no smoothing built in this object so it can click when being updated.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Trimming value in decibels
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Trimmed audio signal
Outlet_2 : Attenuation value
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Optional receive name for trim control
 
 
Example :
 



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vu1~
VU metering of a monophonic audio signal

 
See also vu2~, vu4~, vu5~ and vu8~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Mono audio signal
Inlet_2 : Receives a bang to reset the peak meter
Inlet_3 : Use this to configure the way the VU meter looks
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Name of the label
 
 
Example :
 



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vu2~
VU metering of a stereophonic audio signal

 
See also vu1~, vu4~, vu5~ and vu8~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Left channel of audio signal
Inlet_2 : Right channel of audio signal
Inlet_3 : Receives a bang to reset the peak meter
Inlet_4 : Use this to configure the way the VU meter looks
 
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Name of the label for leftmost VU
Arg_2 : Name of the label for rightmost VU
 
 
Example :
 



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vu4~
VU metering of a quadraphonic audio signal

 
See also vu1~, vu2~, vu5~ and vu8~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Channel 1 of audio signal
Inlet_2 : Channel 2 of audio signal
Inlet_3 : Channel 3 of audio signal
Inlet_4 : Channel 4 of audio signal
Inlet_5 : Receives a bang to reset the peak meter
Inlet_6 : Use this to configure the way the VU meter looks
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Name of the label
 
 
Example :
 
 



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vu5~
VU metering of a five channels audio signal

 
See also vu1~, vu2~, vu4~ and vu8~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Channel 1 of audio signal
Inlet_2 : Channel 2 of audio signal
Inlet_3 : Channel 3 of audio signal
Inlet_4 : Channel 4 of audio signal
Inlet_5 : Channel 5 of audio signal
Inlet_6 : Receives a bang to reset the peak meter
Inlet_7 : Use this to configure the way the VU meter looks
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Name of the label
 
 
Example :
 



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vu8~
VU metering of an octophonic audio signal

 
See also vu1~, vu2~, vu4~ and vu5~.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Channel 1 of audio signal
Inlet_2 : Channel 2 of audio signal
Inlet_3 : Channel 3 of audio signal
Inlet_4 : Channel 4 of audio signal
Inlet_5 : Channel 5 of audio signal
Inlet_6 : Channel 6 of audio signal
Inlet_7 : Channel 7 of audio signal
Inlet_8 : Channel 8 of audio signal
Inlet_9 : Receives a bang to reset the peak meter
Inlet_10 : Use this to configure the way the VU meter looks
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Name of the label
 
 
Example :
 



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zerocross~
noise detector

 
The original implementation for this object is by F. Dechelle.
 
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Understands the following : audio signal, bang and report_message.
 
 
Output
 
Outlet_1 : Outputs the zero crossing count since the last bang was received
 
 
 
Example :
 
 



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zrev1~
reverb tool

 
The zrev1~ object is based on M. Puckette's ISPW version. While zverb is not a true multi-channel reverb, it still does worthwhile things to stereo input, and produces 4 unique outputs.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Audio signal
Inlet_2 : Audio signal
Inlet_3 : First reflection amount in decibels
Inlet_4 : Second reflection amount in decibels
Inlet_5 : Feedback amount in decibels
Inlet_6 : Low-pass filter frequency in hertz
Inlet_7 : Room size in percentage
Inlet_8 : Reverb time in percentage
Inlet_9 : Wet/dry mix value (-1 : 1)

Output
 
Outlet_1 : Channel 1 of audio signal
Outlet_2 : Channel 2 of audio signal
Outlet_3 : Channel 3 of audio signal
Outlet_4 : Channel 4 of audio signal


Example :



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zscale
numeric value mapping object

 
The zscale object is based on the original scale designed for the ISPW by z. settel back in 1994.
 
Input
 
Inlet_1 : Numeric value to be mapped; bang to re-output last value
Inlet_2 : Lower input
Inlet_3 : Higher input
Inlet_4 : Lower output
Inlet_5 : Higher input

Output
 
Outlet_1 : Scaled value
 
Arguments
 
Arg_1 : Input low value (default is 0)
Arg_2 : Input high value (default is 127)
Arg_3 : Output low value (default is 0)
Arg_4 : Output high value (default is 1)
Arg_5 : Exponential base value (default is 1 (n=1 is linear; n>1 is exponential))
 
Example :
 



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Example applications
 
 
Here is an example of how to cast an 8-channel stream using an audio server (icecast/jroar). Low-latency provides a robust and stable transmission. For more information, see the resources folder in the archive.  Selectable quality provides for an eight-channel audio stream ranging from 384 kb/s to 2mb/s.
 
 
 



Here is an example of how to playback an 8-channel stream using an audio server (icecast/jroar). Low-latency provides a robust and stable transmission. For more information, see the resources folder in the archive. 
 
 



Here is an example of how to use different xjimmies to create a multi-channel harmonizer. This example is provided to demonstrate the use of a multi-channel effects processor (signal source) with a dynamically configurable output (e.g. stereo, quad, 5.1 or octo).
 
 


Here is an example of how to use different xjimmies to create a multi-channel blender. Instead of standard single-source panning, this offers the possibility to assign a sound source to each speaker and then move around the different sources.
 
 

The nSLAM multi-channel applications use dynamic output configurations, enabling a user to work with surround panning and sound source location independently of the studio hardware. In order for things to work correctly, the output channels must be connected to the correct speakers.

This test application is intended to help users configure and verify the correct output channel to speaker mapping required when using the nSLAM multi-channel applications.
 
 




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nProposed speakers setup
 

When using multi-channel audio tools, it is important to be able to switch from one configuration to the other in terms of speakers placement. To avoid the physical act of moving speakers around, here is a simple way to configure your studio for the following spatial placements : stereo, quad, five.1 and 8-channels.











Using this configuration, one can easily navigate between speaker setup on the fly using the outchan-defs~ object.
 
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Thanks
 
 
 
nSLAM and the xjimmies were made possible in part by the financial support of the Ministère du Patrimoine Canadien through the Fonds des réseaux de recherche sur les nouveaux médias.

Several of the xjimmies objects and abstractions are derived from the original sources in the IRCAM Jimmies release (1994), with the authorization of IRCAM (nSLAM is also made available on the IRCAM Forum site, as an incentive to PD users to join and contribute to Forum IRCAM). Much Obliged!

The Open Territories project would not have been possible without the support of the Société des arts technologiques, and their espresso machine.

 
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